COLLABORATORS COUNCIL


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Iñaqui Carnicero

CCA Associate Professor of Architecture

Founder/Principal RICA* STUDIO

Professor Iñaqui Carnicero (Madrid, 1973) is an awarded architect and international Phd from Polytechnic University of Madrid. Active in both the academic field at the Polytechnic University in Madrid and Cornell University, and the professional practice, Carnicero has won several competitions and completed many projects, including CEU University, 40 Social housing in Madrid, a High School in Albacete, the restoration of an Arab tower in Guadalajara, the new District Attorney’s Office in Madrid’s City of Justice, Hangar 16 Matadero at a former slaughterhouse of Madrid, and the Pitch´s house. His recent work curating and designing the Spanish Pavilion for the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale with the exhibition “Unfinished” was honored with the Golden Lion.

His work has been recognized with the AIANY Housing Award 2015, Design Vanguard Award 2012, Hauser Award 2012, Emerging Architecture Award Architectural Record 2011, Rome Prize 2009, COAM Award 2012, FAD Spanish Architecture and Public Opinion Award 2012, 2013 Barbara Cappochin Award (Honorable Mention), BSI University of Mendrisio (selected) 2007, shortlisted Architectural Digest award 2009 and BIGMAT 2013, Luigi Cosenza 2004 and exhibit at the RIBA exhibition International Emerging Architects 2011, Architecture week in Prague, GA Gallery Japan 2012. Carnicero has lectured at prestigious institutions such as Cornell, Harvard GSP, Rice, Berkeley, NJIT, Carleton, Roma Tre, La Sapienza, Calgary, Cervantes Institute in Prague, London Roca Gallery, Barcelona La Salle, Madrid ETSAM, Sevilla and Navarra University. He is the director of “Symmetries”, an architecture platform that relates roman and contemporary strategies in the city. His Ph.D. dissertation focuses on Louis Kahn and Robert Venturi’s discoveries and connections with Rome. Since 2014 he has been running the office of RICA* together with his partner Lorena del Rio.


mdheadshot-for-ccaMeghan Dorrian

Meghan Dorrian co-leads Young America Creative, a design firm focused on architecture, graphic design, and building with teams of talented professionals.  Her background in fabrication had led to a specialized interest in material assemblies in projects of variable scales.
In 2015 Meghan taught a two-semester course at CCA in 1:1 prototyping and fabrication, culminating in the final installation of 21 GFRC cast (concrete) benches, fencing and lighting for Tunnel Top Park located in the Dogpatch, SF.  She also teaches at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and DVC, a community college in the East Bay.
Meghan is a graduate of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo’s school of Architecture, where the motto, Learn by Doing, which initially seemed cheesy and is now part of YAC’s daily mantra.  She attended the Architectural Associations graduate program, Design & Make, a two-year program in timber technology that tasks a small team of students to design, fabrication and construct a full-scale building in a remote forested nook of England.  The project, TSS, has been awarded several timber awards and recognitions in structural design and geometry.  She worked in the fabrication offices of Face Design & Fabrication in Brooklyn, Chris French Metal, in Oakland, Envelope Architecture & Design, and Concreteworks before launching YAC with longtime friend and mind reader, Brian Friel.

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Lisa Findley

CCA Professor of Architecture

Professor Lisa Findley is a registered architect and an active architectural journalist who writes primarily in public venues to explore architecture and its position as a visual, material, and cultural practice in a rapidly changing world.

With her graduate degree in Architecture underpinned by undergraduate work in environmental science and policy as well as political theory, Findley’s reading, research, and writing to cross over into many other fields. These range from cultural geography and anthropology to cultural and postcolonial studies, from landscape architecture to natural history and cartography. She travels extensively as an architectural journalist and academic pursuing an ever-increasing understanding of the roles architecture and space play within the dynamics of culture and power, and the role architects and their practices can perform in the exploration and manifestation of locally based modernisms.
Findley is author of the book Building Change: Architecture, Politics, and Cultural Agency (Routledge, 2005) and the following essays, among others: “Architecture and the Representation of Culture: The Tjibaou Cultural Center” in The Green Braid: Towards an Architecture of Ecology, Economy, and Equity (Routledge, 2007), “Once Again by the Pacific: Returning to Sea Ranch” with coauthor Tim Culvahouse in Judging Architectural Value (Minnesota 2007), “Red and Gold: Two Apartheid Museums and the Spatial Politics of Memory in the ‘New’ South Africa” in Places Journal online, 2011, “Becoming Visible: Appropriating the Spaces of Apartheid South Africa” (with coauthor Liz Ogbu) in the book Consuming Architecture (Routledge 2014).

Findley is author of the book Building Change: Architecture, Politics, and Cultural Agency (Routledge, 2005) and the following essays, among others: “Architecture and the Representation of Culture: The Tjibaou Cultural Center” in The Green Braid: Towards an Architecture of Ecology, Economy, and Equity (Routledge, 2007), “Once Again by the Pacific: Returning to Sea Ranch” with coauthor Tim Culvahouse in Judging Architectural Value (Minnesota 2007), “Red and Gold: Two Apartheid Museums and the Spatial Politics of Memory in the ‘New’ South Africa” in Places Journal online, 2011, “Becoming Visible: Appropriating the Spaces of Apartheid South Africa” (with coauthor Liz Ogbu) in the book Consuming Architecture (Routledge 2014).
As an architectural journalist, she has written scores of articles for numerous publications including Architect magazine, Architecture magazine, Architectural Record, Harvard Design Magazine, World Architecture, Architecture Australia, Architecture South Africa, Baumeister and Places Journal. She is also author of introductions for monographs on buildings and architectural practices and of catalog essays.

As an architectural journalist, she has written scores of articles for numerous publications including Architect magazine, Architecture magazine, Architectural Record, Harvard Design Magazine, World Architecture, Architecture Australia, Architecture South Africa, Baumeister and Places Journal. She is also author of introductions for monographs on buildings and architectural practices and of catalog essays. With coeditors Marco Cenzatti and Abidin Kusno, Findley was a theme editor for the spring 2010 issue of the Journal of Architectural Education (JAE) titled Changing Asia. She served on the editorial board of the Journal of Architectural Education from 2004–10 and as a contributing editor to Architectural Record from 2003–10. She is currently on the editorial board of Architecture_MPS, an online journal based in London.

She is a frequent participant in conferences related to architecture, geography, and cultural studies. In addition, she has delivered keynote addresses at symposia on making visible, through architecture, specific marginalized cultures in urban settings as diverse as Melbourne and Washington, D.C
Findley’s current research is on contemporary architects and architectural practices outside of Europe and North America that seek robust locally derived building technologies and formal, spatial and contextual building strategies that form a response to the homogenization and the capital intensive technologies of globalized practice.

With a keen interest in the issues of globalization and it impact on other cultures, Findley has taught and lectured at universities in Malaysia, Australia, and South Africa as well as throughout the United States, and has worked as an international workshop teacher in SE Asia with the Getty Conservation Institute.
Findley has taught architecture at CCA since 1994. She is the founder of CCA’s Graduate Program in Architecture, served as interim chair for both the BArch and MArch Programs from 2005-8, and served as chair of the BArch Program from 2009-12. She teaches both MArch and BArch students in advanced design studios and special topic seminars at CCA. In addition, she leads architecture studio travel programs to China.


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Gregory Hurcomb

CCA Adjunct Professor of Architecture and Interior Design

Principal Studio Gregory Hurcomb

Gregory Hurcomb has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at the International Center of Photography in New York City, USA, and in Berlin, Germany and Sao Paulo, Brazil. He has most recently been appointed as an Adjunct Professor in the Architecture and Interior Design Departments at California College of Arts and will be teaching courses in both the MArch and BArch programs. He has previously taught at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of California, Davis, the University of Pennsylvania and the International Center of Photography. In addition, he has been a guest critic on fine art, design, and architecture reviews at UC Berkeley, UC Davis, California College of the Arts, Academy of Art University, Woodbury University, and the University of Pennsylvania. Currently he writes on Architecture for the Architect’s Newspaper, and has written for Architizer in the past.

Gregory Hurcomb was born and raised in New York and New Jersey, USA. He received his Masters in Architecture from The University of Pennsylvania in 2010. He also earned a certificate of General Studies in Photography from the International Center of Photography in New York City in 2000 and a BA from Rutgers University in Literature in 1999. While at the University of Pennsylvania he was awarded the E. Lewis Dales Traveling Fellowship, an award for excellence in portfolio design and the Donald Prowler Memorial Prize, awarded as a scholarship to graduate students whose work advances the design of sustainable architecture.


Hutchinson_bio_1_BWMatt Hutchinson

CCA Adjunct Professor of Architecture

Founder of PATH

Material and fabrication experiments are at the core of PATH’s working method. The work evolves through a feedback loop always moving between design and making: try something, evaluate it, transform it, see it in a new way. This curiosity to explore material properties and processes along with the continual testing of ideas through prototypes reveals new potentials for design. PATH leverages this curiosity, experience with traditional techniques, and a keen understanding of digital technologies to inform our sensibilities. Though trained as an architect, Matt Hutchinson’s interests in design go beyond the typical constraints of architecture and span a variety of scales and types, testing ideas in the forms of lighting, furniture, architectural components, installations, etc.

Recently as a fellow of the Autodesk Pier 9 AiR program, Hutchinson has pursued design research interests with support from Autodesk and access to their advanced fabrication facility.

In addition to the endeavors with PATH, Matt is faculty at CCA, where he teaches architecture studios (including the Spring 2009 Solar Decathlon Studio – a part of the widely recognized “Refract House”) as well as seminars which build on and are informed by his own materials and fabrication research.
Hutchinson’s previous professional design experience, ranging from Vincent James Associates (Minneapolis), to SHoP Architects (NYC), and to FACE Design (NYC) (among others) has afforded him a diverse and multi-disciplinary perspective. He earned his Bachelor of Architecture at Kent State University and his Master of Architecture at Yale University, where he received the Eero Saarinen scholarship and was twice a finalist for the H. I. Feldman design prize, the school’s highest design honor.


 

schwartz_bwNeal Schwartz

CCA Associate Professor of Architecture

Principal Schwartz and Architecture

Neal Schwartz is the principal of Schwartz and Architecture, a San Francisco based design firm established in 1996.  His architectural practice has been recently profiled in Dwell, Western Interiors, Sunset, Architectural Lighting, San Franciscomagazine, and the San Francisco Chronicle among others.  The firm has recently received a SFAIA Merit Award in Interior Architecture for the RayKo Photo Gallery, and was selected for inclusion in the SFAIA Home Tours 2005. He received a second place award in the San Francisco LGBT Community Center competition (in collaboration with Diane Davis) and was selected as an invited firm in the Santa Rosa Museum of Contemporary Art competition (in collaboration with Simonen Design).

Schwartz holds dual masters degrees in Architecture and Public Policy from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design and Kennedy School of Government respectively.  He graduated with distinction in Architecture, received the Thayer Award for Meritorious Scholarship, the Sheldon Traveling Fellowship as well as an Urban Land Institute National Award and American Planning Association National Award.

Schwartz has been actively involved in teaching for 17 years, most recently as Associate Professor in Architecture and Coordinator of Advanced Studies at California College of the Arts.  He also currently coordinates the Master’s degrees thesis program. Previously, Schwartz has taught at University of California, Berkeley and at Harvard.  He has worked on a number of publications including Assemblage: a Critical Journal of Architecture and Design Culture.  He is the editor of the book Emergent Memory: the National AIDS Memorial Competition, and co-editor of Cross Section 04: CCA Advanced Studio Work.  His most recent publication is Vertical Places: the Tall Building in the World City, part of the CCA Architecture Studio Series.

In addition, Schwartz is on the Board of Directors for the National AIDS Memorial Grove located in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park and is the chair of the Memorial Design Committee guiding the capital campaign, design development and construction of this national memorial.